actuallyexistingbarbarism
By and large, hobbies seem to slowly be exiting our lives. Blame the internet – or the fact that people have no time to achieve anything outside of work, other than safely making it home after sinking five Stellas – but the fact is fewer people nowadays are defined by whatever it is that interests them. It’s not as easy as it once was to bond with people via playing cricket, collecting stamps, stealing cars or pressing leaves. We’re too busy making ends meet. So what better way is there to get people’s attention than building your body so much you have to turn sideways to fit through a door?
Interesting response to the Vice series of Modern Douchebag articles. (via actuallyexistingbarbarism)

Little boxes panic

Some time ago me and sinistrare was returning home from a walk with Max and stopped to look at the apartment buildings… it was really dark outside and every lit living room was like an aquarium with little people doing their things. Watching TV, cleaning up or whatever… 

She stopped, sighed, looked at me and explained that it gave her a sense of something that can be translated as little boxes panic.

It’s the feeling when every apartment seems taken straight from an IKEA catalogue and life is knitted together crudely after reading a really boring manuscript on family life written by some conformist copywriter.

Nothing stands out… it’s as if we are just ants in a big farm. Each performing our identical rituals in our identically allotted space.

While reading David Harvey’s Seventeen Contradictions and the End of Capitalism I stumbled upon this concept… 

Only money that goes out of date like a newspaper, rots like potatoes, evaporates like ether, is capable of standing the test as an instrument of exchange of potatoes, newspapers, iron and ether…

This is so significant in understanding capitalism and the exchanges of amassed work to some sort of capitalist value. In a crude thermodynamic sense money is barely a stored energy and potential work. If you extract work (pile money under your bed) from a system and later want to transform money into work again it has to effect that system again… for ever and ever.
Having money that deteriorates over time and transformations (introducing entropy to capitalisms money concept) would have significant uses in creating a even weirder new economy. Maybe it could solve the problem of concentration of capital amongst the few?

While reading David Harvey’s Seventeen Contradictions and the End of Capitalism I stumbled upon this concept… 

Only money that goes out of date like a newspaper, rots like potatoes, evaporates like ether, is capable of standing the test as an instrument of exchange of potatoes, newspapers, iron and ether…

This is so significant in understanding capitalism and the exchanges of amassed work to some sort of capitalist value. In a crude thermodynamic sense money is barely a stored energy and potential work. If you extract work (pile money under your bed) from a system and later want to transform money into work again it has to effect that system again… for ever and ever.

Having money that deteriorates over time and transformations (introducing entropy to capitalisms money concept) would have significant uses in creating a even weirder new economy. Maybe it could solve the problem of concentration of capital amongst the few?