x-a-z-a-x

x-a-z-a-x:

So… a little short of 4 kilometers seems to be my thighs chafing distance.

In my running tights 5km wasn’t a problem though! Wohoo… That’s why everyone runs in them!!!

Anti-chafing is a brand new world for me. I am more of a antifa, anti-capitalist or antisocial kind of guy.

5 kilometers (in like 40 minutes because I run slow as hell) on a treadmill, by the way, was incredibly boring. Fucking staring through the same window and skipping track after track to find just the right one to keep the stupidity of running indoors at bay.

Today’s soundtrack was mostly Comeback Kid, Merchant Ships and Tiny Moving Parts.

Did the first two kilometers for the 2014 season on a treadmill today!

It felt awesome to run again after the nasty cold I had in december and it was the first run in my new Vivobarefoot Stealth M. I love Vivobarefoot’s shoes for the times when you have to wear shoes (gym, trail or whatever). I owned like a dozen off them by now.

Anywho… I am focusing on cadence for now and thinking about running shorter and faster runs (at least trying to move my feet a lot) to prepare for the 10k goal I have later next year. Before this years end I have vowed to run around Årstaviken (it’s like maybe 6k?).

So the plan is basically: Cadence this winter/spring, shorter runs outside with worn-in Stealth’s early spring and add some distance after that. If the weather is good I will probably add shorter barefoot runs around the block with our dog and some occasional gym sessions.

Maybe it’s just the New Years Spirit but I am looking forward to another season of training and running!

Did the first two kilometers for the 2014 season on a treadmill today!

It felt awesome to run again after the nasty cold I had in december and it was the first run in my new Vivobarefoot Stealth M. I love Vivobarefoot’s shoes for the times when you have to wear shoes (gym, trail or whatever). I owned like a dozen off them by now.

Anywho… I am focusing on cadence for now and thinking about running shorter and faster runs (at least trying to move my feet a lot) to prepare for the 10k goal I have later next year. Before this years end I have vowed to run around Årstaviken (it’s like maybe 6k?).

So the plan is basically: Cadence this winter/spring, shorter runs outside with worn-in Stealth’s early spring and add some distance after that. If the weather is good I will probably add shorter barefoot runs around the block with our dog and some occasional gym sessions.

Maybe it’s just the New Years Spirit but I am looking forward to another season of training and running!

isanisan

I can run less distance when I run at a slow pace.

isanisan:

I can run 3 miles at a 7 minute mile, and I can run 4 miles at 7:30 pace, but my calf muscles give out if I go more than a mile at a 10-11 minute pace. If I speed up after a mile, I’m fine again. What is going on?

I have noticed the exact thing when I walk from work (it’s about 5km). I am not sure but I think I tighten my calfs more and don’t relax them as much as when I am running a faster pace. At a lower pace I tend to take less steps per minute.

But it’s just a theory… try running forward with a slow pace but keep moving your feet fast and see if it improves?

Today me and Sinistrare ran around town and bought some dirt, pots and plants for our balcony.

Max didn’t like that at all (we left him at home for a couple of hours) and when we walked him he got so overexcited, and just a little pissed, that he bit me in frustration. I fucking hate that dog sometimes… but hey, at least he has a loving home now!

Max is a special dog full of… let’s call it, life. We got him before he even was one year old and he had already been around a couple of homes. He didn’t get a stable upbringing as a puppy (this wasn’t the first time (or last I guess) he got overexcited and took a quick bite from any of us) and we have worked through a lot of his issues. But once in a while we slip back and forgets.

After me and Max had sulked a little, we worked on planting our new herbs and tidied up. Now we are ready for the summer!

And after a 4 km barefoot run, we are best pals again.

I got the books I ordered last week!

Barefoot Running Step by Step by Ken Bob Saxton
The Peter Principle: Why Things Always Go Wrong by Laurence J. Peter and Raymond Hull
The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America by David A. Stockman
The unseen by Nanni Balestrini
Reamde by Neal Stephenson
Minecraft: block, pixlar och att göra sig en hacka by Daniel Goldberg and Linus Larsson

I got the books I ordered last week!

  • Barefoot Running Step by Step by Ken Bob Saxton
  • The Peter Principle: Why Things Always Go Wrong by Laurence J. Peter and Raymond Hull
  • The Great Deformation: The Corruption of Capitalism in America by David A. Stockman
  • The unseen by Nanni Balestrini
  • Reamde by Neal Stephenson
  • Minecraft: block, pixlar och att göra sig en hacka by Daniel Goldberg and Linus Larsson
(via Malmö Barefoot Run | 5 Maj 2013)

I would love to run in Malmø Barefoot Run 2013!

But I don’t really have the time or money to travel to our dirty south. I am thinking of running at home instead though (and get the first kilometers under my bare feet). It is still pretty cold up here and the roads are still packed thick with gravel and sand. But with a little luck they will be swept by early may and ready for a short run.

(via Malmö Barefoot Run | 5 Maj 2013)

I would love to run in Malmø Barefoot Run 2013!

But I don’t really have the time or money to travel to our dirty south. I am thinking of running at home instead though (and get the first kilometers under my bare feet). It is still pretty cold up here and the roads are still packed thick with gravel and sand. But with a little luck they will be swept by early may and ready for a short run.

newstfionline

Barefoot Running Can Cause Injuries, Too

newstfionline:

By Gretchen Reynolds, NY Times, March 6, 2013
When Dr. Douglas Brown, a radiologist in Orem, Utah, noticed an uptick recently in the number of barefoot runners he was seeing with heel and foot problems, he wondered if there might be a connection between their unshod training and their sore feet. But he couldn’t find any scientific studies that had examined the issue.

So he approached Sarah Ridge, a professor of exercise science at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, who studies impact injuries in sports, and suggested she undertake one.

The resulting study, published last month in Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, is likely to add fuel to the continuing debate about the benefits of running barefoot or wearing minimalist “barefoot” shoes. Does the barefoot style reduce a runner’s risk of pain and injury (as barefoot enthusiasts believe)? Or does barefoot running simply contribute to the development of a different set of injuries in some runners?

To find out, Dr. Ridge began by recruiting 36 adult, experienced runners, male and female, who, until then, had run between 15 and 30 miles a week while wearing normal running shoes. She sent them to Dr. Brown for baseline M.R.I. scans of their feet and lower legs to check for current injuries or problems.

Those who believe in barefoot running often point out that humans ran and walked without shoes for millennia before footwear was invented. They argue that being unshod is normal for humans and should reverse past injuries related to modern running shoes and prevent future ones.

But anecdotal evidence, including from physicians who treat runners, indicates that some people who take up barefoot running develop entirely new aches and injuries.

Dr. Ridge’s shod volunteers all started the study with normal feet and lower legs, according to their M.R.I. scans, which were read by multiple radiologists.

She then randomly assigned half of the group to continue running as they had: same mileage, same shoes.

The other half were given a pair of Vibram Five Fingers barefoot-style shoes and asked to begin sprinkling barefoot-like mileage into their runs, but gradually. They were told to wear the minimalist shoes for one mile during the first week of the study, two miles the second, three the third, and then as much as they liked, which is what the Vibram Web site recommended at the time of the 2011 study.

After 10 weeks, both groups of runners received a follow-up M.R.I. There was no evidence of injuries to or changes in the tissues of the lower leg, like the Achilles’ tendon, among any of the runners. But more than half of the runners wearing the minimalist shoes now showed early signs of bone injuries in their feet.

Specifically, most had developed bone marrow edema, an accumulation of fluid, similar to what happens during bruising, in their foot bones. The radiologists graded the edema on a scale of 0 to 4, with 0 representing no edema and 1 the slight bone damage caused by simply moving around on and loading the foot. This amount of edema is considered healthy, a sign that the bone is responding to training and growing stronger.

Most of the runners in the control group, who were wearing their normal shoes, had edema levels of 1 throughout their feet.

But a majority of the runners in the minimalist-shoe group had developed at least a level 2 edema, “which indicates early bone injury,” Dr. Ridge said, and three had signs of more-extensive level 3 bone edema, “which constitutes an actual injury,” Dr. Ridge said.

Two even had full stress fractures or level 4 edema, one in her heel bone and one in his metatarsal, the bones that connect the ankle and toes.

Almost all of the runners in the minimalist shoe group were spontaneously running fewer miles at the end of the 10 weeks than they had been at the start, “probably,” Dr. Ridge said, “because their feet hurt.”

The results don’t mean that everyone who chooses to switch to minimal or no footwear will court foot injury, Dr. Ridge said. “But I would tell anyone who wants to try” kicking off their normal shoes, “to be extremely cautious during the transition period.” In her study, substituting a mere mile per week of normal running at the start with one in minimal shoes “was probably too much,” she says. So go slow.

Barefoot-style running may have been natural for our ancestors, Dr. Ridge points out, but it’s a new experience for most of our feet.

Your mileage may most certainly vary…